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Both cam and crank sensors were 61 dollars together. All the other parts needed to be done the price you pay for buying a car that wasn't well taken care of by the previous owner.

The car got a needed tune up and once those sensor's are installed the starting issue will be resolved. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
haha I hope so I actually love the car and I bought lowering springs for it just waiting to order the struts.
 

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Yep , +1
 

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That is good news. I have been having intermittent issues with mine that I am pretty sure are related to the ignition coils (Flashing SES light and really rough idle, plus occasional long cranking bouts). I've had the no starting issue on occasion since the car was about a year old. My favorite answer from the dealership was "you can't move the car short distances, like backing it out of the driveway to let out my other car and then just turn it off, it has to run for about 15 minutes, otherwise it will flood and can't start again until it evaporates."
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
That is good news. I have been having intermittent issues with mine that I am pretty sure are related to the ignition coils (Flashing SES light and really rough idle, plus occasional long cranking bouts). I've had the no starting issue on occasion since the car was about a year old. My favorite answer from the dealership was "you can't move the car short distances, like backing it out of the driveway to let out my other car and then just turn it off, it has to run for about 15 minutes, otherwise it will flood and can't start again until it evaporates."

That sucks but it does sound a lot like the sensor and the problems I was having with my car. The crank sensor sucked mostly because I'm short and it was hard to get at but over all it wasn't the worst part to replace.
 

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That sucks but it does sound a lot like the sensor and the problems I was having with my car. The crank sensor sucked mostly because I'm short and it was hard to get at but over all it wasn't the worst part to replace.
It took me a while on that crank sensor too, that was one of my problems last year. Between my lack of height and it being buried in the engine mount for whatever reason they were thinking, it took over an hour. Honestly it was about as bad as changing a headlight on my Subaru, which is insanely difficult for a routine part.
 

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Another one that repaired that famous Crank Sensor !
 

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I have a 2006 2.5. Same thing. Hard to start 15-20 minutes after it's been running.

I found this post months ago and tried what was suggested. No luck. Not the crank or camshaft sensors. Replaced them both with Hitachi's twice. Not the fuel pump. Not the plugs not the coils not the throttle body. Replaced that with two different brands. The dealer tells me the 2006 is not part of the recall to reprogram the PCM because of overheating camshaft crankshaft sensor problems. Didn't happen all winter now that it's getting warm out again it's doing it. I thought I had it fixed. But here it is again. It's depressing because I like the car. Something else interesting the other day the starter went. The starter came with a paper talking about the replacement of the fuse box as a possible reason for a no start. I'm assuming that's when it just clicks like a starter. Which is not this problem. But still makes you wonder if this problem is something that's not obvious. Like programming or a circuit board somewhere
10940
 

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Not the crank or camshaft sensors. Replaced them both with Hitachi's twice. Not the fuel pump. Not the plugs not the coils not the throttle body. Replaced that with two different brands. The dealer tells me the 2006 is not part of the recall to reprogram the PCM because of overheating camshaft crankshaft sensor problems. Didn't happen all winter now that it's getting warm out again it's doing it. I thought I had it fixed. But here it is again.
That bulletin is for a "no crank", not a "hard start". Long cranking times on QR25's are almost always from a cam or crank sensor, but it may not be the sensor's fault, First, check to make sure the sensors are fully seated and that there isn't rust or crud preventing it. If that checks okay, test the integrity of the ground wires on both sensors and of your block ground. You may have a ground connection that's getting high resistance after the car warms up. To check those, with the car warm and running, put your voltmeter on millivolts (mV) and measure between the block and the negative battery post. You should see no higher than 50 mV (0.05V), 15 mV is probably average for a healthy Altie. If it's high then your ground cable has an issue. Then backprobe the cam and crank sensor ground wires at each sensor with a safety-pin, measuring to the engine block. You should see no more than about 25 mV. If it's higher, then the individual sensor ground wire or your ECM ground has an issue. If that isn't the problem, inspect both of the reluctors for magnetic debris (especially the cam, which is relatively slow-turning). I know the crank reluctor is a complete PIA because of the sensor location, but it can be inspected with a dentist mirror and flashlight and cleaned by putting a strong magnet in the hole and turning the engine tooth by tooth with a wrench to suck off the debris.
 

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That bulletin is for a "no crank", not a "hard start". Long cranking times on QR25's are almost always from a cam or crank sensor, but it may not be the sensor's fault, First, check to make sure the sensors are fully seated and that there isn't rust or crud preventing it. If that checks okay, test the integrity of the ground wires on both sensors and of your block ground. You may have a ground connection that's getting high resistance after the car warms up. To check those, with the car warm and running, put your voltmeter on millivolts (mV) and measure between the block and the negative battery post. You should see no higher than 50 mV (0.05V), 15 mV is probably average for a healthy Altie. If it's high then your ground cable has an issue. Then backprobe the cam and crank sensor ground wires at each sensor with a safety-pin, measuring to the engine block. You should see no more than about 25 mV. If it's higher, then the individual sensor ground wire or your ECM ground has an issue. If that isn't the problem, inspect both of the reluctors for magnetic debris (especially the cam, which is relatively slow-turning). I know the crank reluctor is a complete PIA because of the sensor location, but it can be inspected with a dentist mirror and flashlight and cleaned by putting a strong magnet in the hole and turning the engine tooth by tooth with a wrench to suck off the debris.
Thanks! Will do this tomorrow.
 

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I tested the voltage on both and they were within spec. I had replaced the camshaft and crankshaft sensors prior including the connector of the crankshaft sensor which was damaged by the prior owner so this confirms that is all good. Now where to go? It's not the fuel pump I've replaced that recently thinking it was the problem. No codes currently. But I do have a negative long-term fuel trim. So the PCM is holding back fuel. Why? I don't have a specific misfire so I can't narrow it down to a specific cylinder. So I'm going to shotgun the fuel injectors and buy another coil. Replace the fuel injectors and wait just to confirm what the problem was if it was that.
 

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Bad injectors on an Altie would be pretty rare, and if the hard warm-starts are from flooding you should get a telltale puff of white, acrid "rich smoke" out the tailpipe right after she starts. However, with a goofy LTFT there could just be varnish or crap in the fuel system. Try a couple cans of SeaFoam. Dunno if your new sensors were OE or aftermarket, but if they were aftermarket then they're not necessarily trustworthy. I'm not big on telling people "stick to OE" for most replacement parts, but CKP's and CMP's are an exception. I can't begin to tell you how much grief and heartache we've seen over the years with cheap China sensors.
 
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